Mini Travel Guide: Taiwan

Looking for a travel guide to Taiwan? I lived there are 2 years - here are my best Taiwan travel tips: where to go, what to do, what to eat, and how to do it cheaply!
I spent August 2004 – April 2006 living and working in Chung Li, Taiwan. Friends, Taiwan is not for everyone.  It’s polluted, hot, crowded and the 7-11’s smell like rotting tea eggs.
But it’s also full of great street food, awesomely weird fashion, insane festivals and really lovely people.  And it’s not really part of the backpacker route!  So you can avoid those group of drunk 19-year-old British guys!

Looking for a travel guide to Taiwan? I lived there are 2 years - here are my best Taiwan travel tips: where to go, what to do, what to eat, and how to do it cheaply!

Taiwan Must go

Taipei 101

You’d be remiss in your role as a tourist if you didn’t go to the top of this building.  It was once the tallest building in the world but Dubai put an end to that.  Your ears will actually pop in the elevator!

Toroko gorge

This is Taiwan’s answer to The Grand Canyon and it’s a lovely, natural getaway in super-industrialized Taiwan.  The entire canyon is made of marble and the water is crazy blue.  There’s good swimming and the Taiwanese interpretation of ‘hiking’ (read: walking on a four-foot-wide paved path through the wilderness)

Alishan mountain

The valleys below Alishan have a tropical climate but the top of the mountain has an alpine climate.  This means if you get up very, very early and climb aboard a bus with a million other people, you can actually watch the sun rise over the clouds – like this!

Yenshui fireworks festival

A festival high in the mountains, during which you dress in  a full-body rainsuit, gloves, a full-face helmet and drape wet towels around your neck.  Why?  Because huge structures filled with fireworks are ignited and shot at you, obviously.  I went to this and it was equal parts bizarre and awesome.

Looking for a travel guide to Taiwan? I lived there are 2 years - here are my best Taiwan travel tips: where to go, what to do, what to eat, and how to do it cheaply!

Taiwan Must do

Night marketing shopping

It’s crowded and weird but incredibly awesome.  You can pick up adorable/strange things for a pittance (lighters shaped like pigs! pet bunnies! a million different things covered in rhinestones!), buy your dinner and get acupuncture.

Try betel nut

All those people you see around Asia with red mouths?  They’re not zombies, they’re betel nut chewers.  And those skantily clad girls sitting in glass-fronted stores will sell you betel nut.  Betel nut are a mild stimulant – you’ll probably feel the same way you did when you snuck your first cigarette out behind the garage with your best friend.  They made the back of my knees sweat!

Rent a room in a karaoke bar

This isn’t the karaoke you’re used to.  There are no strange drunks heckling you while you slaughter ‘My Heart Will Go On” and you don’t have to nurse one lukewarm beer and nibble on peanuts.
In Taiwan, you rent a plush room by the hour, so the only drunks heckling you will be your friends.  Lots of KTVs (as they’re called in the ‘Wan) also include a buffet or drinks in the price.  Also, sometimes sex workers.
Looking for a travel guide to Taiwan? I lived there are 2 years - here are my best Taiwan travel tips: where to go, what to do, what to eat, and how to do it cheaply!

Taiwan Must eat

Stinky tofu

Fried fermented tofu with strips of pickled vegetables and sri racha sauce.  Don’t be dissuaded by that awful smell.  As bad as it smells – that’s as good as it tastes!

Dan bing

Taiwan’s breakfast of champions!  A rice flour and onion ‘tortilla’ with fried egg and your choice of American cheese or ham.  Dan bing plus a sub par latte costs $1.

Sugar street strawberries

Giant strawberries on a long wooden skewer that have been dipped in a big vat of hot toffee so they have a thin candy shell.

Hairy beans

Steamed edamame stir fried with olive oil, garlic, salt, pepper and star anise.  Oily and yummy and sure to make your breath stink.

Looking for a travel guide to Taiwan? I lived there are 2 years - here are my best Taiwan travel tips: where to go, what to do, what to eat, and how to do it cheaply!

Cultural tip

‘Personal space’ and ‘standing in line’ are concepts that aren’t necessarily recognized in Taiwan – or much of Asia. If you stand more than three inches away from someone, people will believe that those four inches are a personal invitation to them – you’ve now invited them to budge in front of you in he 7-11 line.

You can either
a) start standing really close to people
b) get over it
c) learn to say (in Chinese) “Excuse me, I believe the line starts back there.”
Looking for a travel guide to Taiwan? I lived there are 2 years - here are my best Taiwan travel tips: where to go, what to do, what to eat, and how to do it cheaply!

Traveling on the cheap

It might seem strange to couchsurf in a country where most people don’t speak your language, but Taiwan is thick with expats teaching English and working in technology – and most of them are fellow travelers who will be thrilled to show you around their local night market. Check out the Taiwan, Ho! message board for more possible hosts.

If you’ve got a decent travel budget or you want something nicer than a stranger’s couch, Airbnb is obviously always an option. This 4 bedroom apartment in Chungli (where I used to live!) is $16 USD per night! If you’ve never used Airbnb before, here’s a $40 credit towards your first booking.

Awesome anecdote 

One of my favorite things about living in Taiwan was dabbling with strange (and cheap) beauty treatments. After successful dalliances with reflexology foot massages and a surprisingly flattering mullet (?!) I decided to get my eyebrows threaded. And I came to this decision on a Tuesday night while walking through the night market.
A salon had set up a tiny booth and after determining that threading would cost all of $6, I mimed to them that I only wanted my eyebrows threaded. They patted my arm knowingly and pointed me towards a pink cot.
So I lay there in the street, at midnight, with crowds of people walking past, a beautician crouching over my face, preparing to remove hair from my face with a loop of thread. But as she leaned in closer, her eyes widened and she shouted for her friends to join her. They crowded around my pink cot and stared at my face.
The lead threader pointed at my fine blond eyelashes and with authority announced “Mayo lah!” and her friends nodded sadly.
What does “Mayo lah” mean? It means “Doesn’t have.” Awesome.
Have you ever visited Taiwan?  Share you tips and links in the comments!
photos by luke ma // mark kao // Andrew Haimerl on Unsplash

9 Comments

Tami (Teacher Goes Back to School)

Oh such weird connections to my very strange life…. I've never really thought of Taiwan until 2 days ago – we're now thinking of adopting from here instead of Thailand. My birthday is March 20th.

Crazy.

Sorry for the weird comment – just all these things together is kinda tripping me out.

Reply
A.Co

LOL – Mayolah – sheesh, they sure are subtle!! 😉

Holy recommendations – if I ever go to Taiwan I'll certainly be back to remind myself of where to go 🙂

A.Co @ A.Co est. 1984

Reply
Jules

Thanks! I'm living in China, and about to head to Taiwan for a visit this summer…this was helpful!

Reply
MiN

my sis has been in taiwan for 5 years.. i went there 5 years ago and it's one of my fave places! people there are extremely friendly! beware of vicious mosquitoes in chinese temples though, i had to see a doctor because they made my legs swell!

Reply
C*Tsaur

My family is from Taiwan and we go back to visit all the time!! There are so many awesome things I love about Taiwan but be warned that the sizes tend to run small there! being a size 6 or 8 in US means you'll probably be an XL or XXl in Taiwan and might not even be able to find any clothes at all if you're anything larger than that.

Also don't forget to haggle over prices. Even in department stores there is some flexibility in the pricing!

Reply
Anthony Ellison

Ass much as I would like to praise the blog for its content I am offended by the "So you can avoid those group of drunk 19-year-old British guys!" comment!I have been lucky enough to travel widely through most of south east Asia and yes I am English but for the most part the drunken miscreants to be avoided are generally always Americans!

Reply
Shireen

I love Taiwan, and I also taught English and lived in South Korea for a year- so I know allll about weird Asian customs. I'm thinking of going back!

Reply

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