Web Time Wasters

Doesn’t this sound like 1997?

What’d you get up to this week, friends? I finally saw Bohemian Rhapsody, warmed myself at the Como Park Conservatory, and celebrated filing our taxes with a meal at The Red Stag Supper Club. I hope your week was also filled with flowers, movies, and good food.

Links for you

I’m an under-buyer and I’ve had this $30 item in my Amazon cart for LITERALLY A YEAR. I finally bought it and, yes, it’s as amazing as I’d hoped.

Somewhat related: over in the Money & Happy Facebook group, we’re having a really great, honest conversation about family financial support and it’s very illuminating.

YES.

Two cheap, easy recipes I’m going to try: roasted buffalo chickpea bowls + crispy baked tofu with broccoli

This is why we need The No Grocery Challenge! 😆

Why People Wait 10 Days to Do Something That Takes 10 Minutes
As any good chore procrastinator knows, the drama doesn’t simply end with deciding to do something later. For Gloria Fraser, a caretaker from Massachusetts, that’s where it just begins. She’s always considered herself a prompt, efficient person in her professional life, but the emotional baggage of housework makes personal chores more difficult. “There’s the negative tape going on in my head that I should have done something, and why did I wait until it got this bad,” she says. “So that’s piling up, and instead of doing it, I’m thinking about all the times I should have been. So I end up kind of catatonic over not doing stuff instead of doing that stuff.”

Somewhat related: 5 business tasks you’ve been putting off that, yes, you need to do

And also somewhat related: If the open rates of your business’s newsletter have been going down, you’re not alone! Deliverability rates have decreased across many providers.

Accurate.

I appreciate Cup Of Jo’s interviews with stepmoms 

I am extremely co-signed on Captain Awkward’s advice to this woman
I just want you to keep in mind that “shopping for symbolic jewelry items” may not come “naturally” to your chosen spouse, but he had and continues to have choices open to him. Some of these choices are: 1) Goobingle it 2) There are many step-by-step guides! 3) You can make the decision/ask the question about becoming engaged and save the whole darn jewelry bit for later, 4) Or use a silly/fun/cheap stand-in prop if the ritual is important 5) You can ask for help, like“Can we take an afternoon and sort this out together?” 6) You can ask for specific suggestions, like: “Here is my approximate budget, can you show me some examples of rings you might like, or would you like to pick something out together?” 7) You can set/manage expectations: “I haven’t mentioned it before because I saving up so I can get you something really nice and I wanted it to be a surprise, but it doesn’t have to be a surprise if waiting is stressing you out so much!”  IF PEOPLE WANT TO MARRY YOU, THEY HAVE MANY WAYS TO LET YOU KNOW. You told him this particular step/symbol was important to you more than once, so it shouldn’t be a mystery that it’s important to you.

Also totally co-signed with this: Let’s Stop Making Excuses for Our Spaces (and Love Them As-Is)

A cute idea for gardening this spring!

I love Wendy’s ideas for different ways to style what you already own.

Ha!

Related: The unpleasant truth behind why we “can’t” break bad habits

4 Comments

ainomiaka

The “love your spouse as are and don’t ask them to do anything different” ethos does bother me because it’s so often used to beat women into putting up with awful stuff from men. At some point I just want to say “no, it’s okay to have boundaries and expectations that your adult partner will have a reasonable percentage of their own stuff handled without you having to do it, and will care about what you want. That is not refusing to love them.”

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